Marguerite Wildenhain Studio Vase

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Marguerite Wildenhain Studio Vase

1,500.00

Marguerite Wildenhain Trumpet Vase
Marguerite Wildenhain (1896-1985) born Lyon, France. Educated and worked in Germany.  Ceramicist, teacher and author active in California.
Signed on bottom "Pond Farm" with signature jug form, n.d.
Classic trumpet base with flared lip, black slip forms concentric pair of narrow and wide black stripes near lip just below blue green drip glaze with milky free form flourish at bulbous center across rich chocolate brown glaze.
8”ht 4.25”diam
Wildenhain Biography:  
Wildenhain is famous for her her own work and the workshops she founded and ran for years at Pond Farm-her studio in Guerneville, California along the Russian River.  Influential writings included Pottery: Form and Expression, 1959; and The Invisible Core: A Potter's Life and Thoughts, 1973.
Education: studied sculpture at Hochschule fur Kunst in Berlin; Art and Design study at Weimer Bauhaus school, 1919-1926 with the sculptor Gerhard Marcks and potter Max Krehen; graduating as Master Potter.
Head of Ceramics instruction at Halle; simultaneously developed prototypes for dinnerware for Konigliche Porzellan-Manufaktur, KPM-now Staatliche Porzellan-Manufaktur  
Forced to leave her teaching post in 1933 when the National Socialists seized power, Wildenhain moved to the Netherlands where she and her husband, fellow potter Franz Wildenhain established Het Kruikje or "Little Jug," pottery studio and shop (hence the subsequent iconic Pond Farm clay jug mark).
Fleeing the Nazis, in 1940, Wildenhain left for the US holding brief positions at Black Mountain College, the Appalachian Institute of Arts and Crafts, and the Oakland School of Arts and Crafts eventually finding her way to the Artist's colony in Pond Farm where she settled and focused for decades thereafter on ceramic production and instruction offering summer classes attracting luminaries such as Harrison McIntosh and innumerable others, becoming as Arneson described, "the Grand dame of potters."

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