Franco Albini for Arflex Fiorenza Leather LoungeChair

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Franco Albini for Arflex Fiorenza Leather LoungeChair

7,800.00

Franco Albini for Arflex “Fiorenza Chair” 1952
Leather lounge chair with wood X-Frame
In 1952, Franco Albini reinterpreted for Arflex an earlier 1939 lounge chair design resulting in the “Fiorenza Chair."   
This current production example from Arflex dating from the early 21st century embodies their history of ceaseless refinement of production within the contours of the original design.
Albini, a leader of the postwar movement in Italy of “Neo-Rationalist” designers, is renowned for successfully deploying new modernist forms within the stricture of traditional craftsmanship and architecture.  
This chair embodies that 20th century dialectic between craft and technology calling to mind the radical forms made possible with modern materials like latex polyurethane and free-form thinking while grounded in classic wood-construction, traditional forms-in this case the wing-back smoking chair.
Also consistent with the Neo-Rationalist school is the clarity of structure embodied by a wood exo-skeleteon displaying Albini’s penchant for the x-base support system made famous with his reductive desk design for Knoll. The legs and arm support made visible here provide an architectural counterpoint to the sensuous leather wrapped forms above.
Almost at odds with the rational component of this chair is Albini’s allowance here for the kind of exuberance closely associated with Mollino and other designers of his day in Italy.  The chair, so clear and logical, is, at the same time, curvaceous and sexy.
Albini singularly straddles the world of rational structure and expressive design. Along with more libidinal designers like Mollino, Parisi and Zanuso, he helped to define a distinctively Italian take on postwar design that was modern but sensual- provocative even-as opposed to the more rational and rigid forms so often associated with modernity.
28”w 16”seat ht 34”dp 40”ht

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